What You Don’t See In Star Wars


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Most everyone is familiar with all of the wild things in the universe – lightsabers, spaceships, aliens and the like. But not many people realize that there’s actually quite a bit of paperwork that has to be filed in a complex and expansive galaxy.

We found a few of these galactic documents that would shed light on the unseen side of how business runs planet to planet.

Click on each image below to view a larger PDF.

Tatooine Department of Civil Vehicles
Luke’s landspeeder sale was negotiated in a relatively short amount of time. Not many people know that the Tatooine Department of Civil Vehicles couldn’t process the transaction for months due to a backlog and bureaucratic ineptitude.
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Armed Forces of the Galactic Empire Application
While Luke was selling his landspeeder, stormtrooper Davin Felth was searching for him. Years before being assigned to a stormtrooper squad, Felth had dreams of piloting an AT-AT. However he didn’t read the fine print on his 214 page application, which stated that he could be transferred to foot soldier duty at any time.
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    Boba Fett’s Free Lancer Invoice
    Jabba the Hutt often hired bounty hunters to hunt down those who crossed him. Boba Fett was the most respected of all of them, but his services came with a heavy price when he billed for his hourly services.
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    Anakin Skywalker’s Medical Bill
    While everybody worries about their insurance covering a trip to the bacta tank, most people wouldn’t even dream of being able to pay the medical costs of being completely dismembered.
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    The Death Star’s Account Warning
    The rebels’ chances of destryoing the Death Star weren’t the only thing that Grand Moff Tarkin underestimated. Had he lived to receive this bill, he would’ve had to demonstrate the full power of the Imperial coffers. Since he didn’t, however, it has since been forwarded to collections.
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